Literally Just 315 Lower-Carb Recipes To Bookmark For Later

Delicious breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack options, from all over the internet, that you’ll definitely want to try.

Before you start, here’s a quick reminder of what a carbohydrate is.

Before you start, here's a quick reminder of what a carbohydrate is.

Carbs are one of the three macronutrients — the other two being protein and fat — and they're our body’s main source of energy. There are also two types: complex carbs and simple carbs. The difference is that complex carbs (sweet potatoes, lentils, beans, etc.) will keep you full for much longer than simple carbs (fruit, juice, and candy) because simple carbs are easily digested and turned into energy at a faster pace than complex ones.

We've shared lots of great lower-carb recipes over the years, so we decided to gather a bunch of our most delicious roundups here in one place for you — you can either read them now or bookmark them for later.

All right, enjoy!

Warner Bros. / Via giphy.com

For some options that are great for when you’re starting out on your lower-carb journey:

For some options that are great for when you're starting out on your lower-carb journey:

Get the full list at 103 Things To Cook If You're Trying To Eat Fewer Carbs.

instagram.com / Via Instagram: @xtinebyrne

And then some recipes for when you’ve started getting the hang of it:

And then some recipes for when you've started getting the hang of it:

Get the full list at 24 Crazy Delicious Recipes That Are Super Low-Carb.

Lauren Zaser / Via buzzfeed.com

For when you’re craving your favorite comfort foods:

For when you're craving your favorite comfort foods:

Get the full list at 27 Low-Carb Versions Of Your Favorite Comfort Foods.

Jo (Jo Cooks) / Via jocooks.com

For when you need delicious recipes with no meat:

For when you need delicious recipes with no meat:

Get the full list at 21 Filling Low-Carb Recipes With No Meat.

Olena (iFoodReal) / Via ifoodreal.com

For dinners options that also pack tons of flavor:

For dinners options that also pack tons of flavor:

Get the full list at 16 Low-Carb Dinners That Aren't Boring.

Jessica Gavin / Via jessicagavin.com

For simple lunch recipes that you’ll definitely be excited to crack into at noon:

For simple lunch recipes that you'll definitely be excited to crack into at noon:

Get the full list at 23 Low-Carb Lunches That Will Actually Fill You Up.

Mike (The Iron You) / Via theironyou.com

For some genius recipe hacks that’ll make eating less carbs a lot easier:

For some genius recipe hacks that'll make eating less carbs a lot easier:

Get the full list at 7 Easy Ways To Eat Fewer Carbs This Week.

Lauren Zaser / Via BuzzFeed

For tasty snack ideas that will keep you from getting hangry throughout the day:

For tasty snack ideas that will keep you from getting hangry throughout the day:

Get the full list at 23 Low-Carb Snacks To Eat When You're Trying To Be Healthy.

Emily (Bound By Food) / Via boundbyfood.com

For awesome dinners you can whip up in 30 minutes or less:

For awesome dinners you can whip up in 30 minutes or less:

Get the full list at 17 Lower-Carb Meals For Busy Weeknights That Actually Look Delicious.

Carina (Cafe Delights) / Via cafedelites.com

For easy-to-make breakfasts that’ll keep you going through the morning:

For easy-to-make breakfasts that'll keep you going through the morning:

Get the full list at 31 Low-Carb Breakfasts That Will Actually Fill You Up.

Kalyn Denny / Via kalynskitchen.com

And last but not least, for dinner recipes that are all under 500 calories:

And last but not least, for dinner recipes that are all under 500 calories:

Get the full list at 23 Low-Carb Dinners Under 500 Calories That Actually Look Good AF.

Emily (Bound By Food) / Via boundbyfood.com

Need a Tool to Help You Keep Track of Your Finances? Try a Bullet Journal

Usually, when a new trend or fad comes around, it gains steam, sticks around for a month or two and then disappears.

But last year, I heard about something that has changed my life (no, really) for the better — and it seems to be here to stay.

I started bullet journaling in August of 2016. Since then, I’ve built up good habits, squashed bad ones, created routines, learned how to follow a schedule, gotten organized, become more focused and, as if that’s not enough, I’ve finally put my finances in order.

Wait, wait, wait. Journal? Finances? How do those go together?

Not Your Average Journal

The bullet journal isn’t necessarily a journal per se.

It’s actually somewhere between a planner, a journal, a notepad, an organizer and a captain’s log (it’s just that you’re the captain, and your life is the ship — don’t wreck it).

You know that moment when you order a new planner, wait a few days, tear into the packaging, crack the spine and realize that while yeah, this layout will probably work, it’s just not quite what you need it to be?

Not so with the bullet journal.

The bullet journal is a completely customizable organizational system that allows you to create tracking, planning, note-taking and record-keeping tools that work for your specific lifestyle. You create your own “pages,” “spreads” and “trackers” (you can learn more on the official bullet journal website) and are never bound by a system that doesn’t completely and totally work for you.

In short, the bullet journal is whatever you need or want it to be.

Right now, though, I really want to talk about how I’ve been using finance tracking tools and spreads to revamp the way I handle, track, spend and save my money.

How a Bullet Journal Can Help You Fix Your Finances

First, set up the base of your bullet journal with the instructions and guides found here. Then, because a bullet journal is so customizable, you can look at your own problem areas.

Do you need to be better about sticking to a budget? Do you need to pay off debt? Do you have some big savings goals? Great! There’s a bullet journal “spread” (official lingo) for that.

Let’s start where any solid financial plan starts: with a budget.

How to Use Your Bullet Journal as a Budget Tracker

hands writing in a journal

Heather Comparetto/The Penny Hoarder

Because the bullet journal is what you make it, there are an infinite amount of options for setting up your budget spread.

I broke down my budget into categories, starting with the unavoidables (bills, rent, gas and the like) and working forward from there. I included everything, right down to my Spotify subscription and the fact that once in a while I just need to order the more expensive pizza.  

When I start drawing out a new spread in my BuJo (that’s the pretentious bullet journaling way to avoid typing bullet journal every time) I like to do a little search on Google or Instagram to see what kinds of spreads other people are having success with. I use these as a jumping off point, adding a few personalized tweaks of my own along the way.

I drew out my budget spread in bars. This is a monthly spread, so I can visually gauge my budget based on which week of the month I’m in. As I color in the bar each time I spend, I’ll have a visual representation of how much I have left in that category.

At the end of the month, I’ll add up my total spending compared to my total budget, write that down on next month’s budget page, and turn it into a little competition with myself where I try to spend a little less. If I succeed, the extra goes toward paying off my student loans.

How to Track Your Bills in Your Bullet Journal

a topdown view of an open bullet journal

Heather Comparetto/The Penny Hoarder

I’m a forgetful person.

If something isn’t written down in front of my face, on the wall next to my bed when I wake up, tattooed across my forehead when I look in the mirror or noted in my bullet journal, there’s a good chance it just isn’t ever going to get done.

But paying bills on time is an important part of adult life; I’m on a quest to actually feel like a real grown-up someday, so a bill tracker was a must in my financial strategy.

For my bill tracker, I wanted to create a big-picture spread that stretched from now through the next several months. I drew inspiration from a BuJo blogger (it’s a lifestyle, y’all) I follow and went to work.

I went back through my bank statement to make sure I counted every bill I pay each month. Then I drew my grid, making sure to include a space for the amount, the due date and whether or not I had paid it yet. I decided to leave a few extra boxes at the bottom of my tracker in case I need to add an extra line item or two over the next several months.

I put my monthly bills in one spread, and I’ll put my quarterly and annual bills together in a separate tracker. As I pay each bill, I’ll check the box so I can see at a glance which ones still need to be addressed.

How to Track Your Spending in Your Bullet Journal

an overtop view of an open bullet journal

Heather Comparetto/The Penny Hoarder

If you’re pretty good about sticking to your budget and paying off your debt (or if you have no debt!), you may decide not to use a spending tracker every month.

Sometimes, though, I like to add a spending tracker into my weekly or monthly section for a financial reboot of sorts. If I ever feel like my finances are getting a little out of control, it helps to see exactly when and how I’m spending every dollar. It’s seriously an eye-opening experience each time I try it.

This one has a lot of flexibility in how you choose to set it up, but the main things I like to include are a space to write the item/food/experience I purchased, the store/venue I purchased it from, the date, the cost, whether I used debit or credit and whether it was a want or a need.

After a month — or even a week — of tracking your spending, you start to see patterns and problem areas that you otherwise might not be aware of.

How to Track Your Savings In Your Bullet Journal

a topdown view of an open bullet journal

Heather Comparetto/The Penny Hoarder

This one is the most exciting of the financial trackers (in my opinion, anyway).

While all of the other BuJo trackers help you watch your paycheck dwindle away each month, the savings goal tracker gets you amped each and every time you get to fill in a little more of that bar because you know you’re one step closer to that dream vacation or that new, extra-deep couch you can’t wait to curl up on.

For my savings tracker, I like to give each goal its own horizontal or vertical bar. As I move money to my savings, I color in the appropriate amount of the bar for the savings goal I’m working toward. Some goals might be small, and some might be huge — but you can move the bigger, unfinished goals from journal to journal as you fill each book.

I’m a visual and tactile person, so being able to see my savings goals and fill them in a little at a time gives me a nerdy little rush of adrenaline.

How to Track Your Debt Payoff in Your Bullet Journal

OK, so this one’s pretty fun, too.

I mean, I know I’m not the only one who gets a little thrill every time I go above and beyond my usual debt payments — and this spread always makes me want to race to the top of the bar.

For my student loans, I make one large bar so I can see exactly how far I have to go. Then, I make several smaller bars so I can break down the total into more manageable — and less discouraging — pieces.

I also like to mark time-oriented goalposts along the sides of the bars so that I have a little self-imposed incentive to pay off a certain amount by a certain time. If I’m trying to reach a debt-payoff goal by a predetermined date, I’m more inclined to allocate my extra dollars and cents there whenever there’s money left over.

BuJo is Life

Once you start bullet journaling, it’s really, really easy to get hooked.

I’ve given it up once or twice when life got crazy (which is when I should have been using it the most, honestly) but I always come back to it after realizing that I have six different notepads, four different spreadsheets and eight different phone apps all doing the work that one single bullet journal could do.

With the bullet journal, I can keep my budget, my spending habits, my savings and my debts all in one place.

Besides, there’s just something special about putting pen to paper, ya know?

Grace Schweizer is a junior writer at The Penny Hoarder. She’s still hunting for the perfect pen, so hit her up on Twitter @Schweizer_Grace if you have any good suggestions.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

4 Quick Steps That Can Help Turn Around a Poor Credit Score

It’s no secret your credit score is important. The better your score, the better deal you get on a mortgage or a car loan or credit card.

We’re talking big money here.

Even if you’re not buying a house anytime soon, a lousy credit score means you’ll get mugged for a high security deposit whenever you rent a car or move into a new apartment.

But improving your credit seems like such a long-term project, doesn’t it?

After all, it can literally take years for negative information to finally come off your credit report. That one phone call you got from that rude bill collector can stain your record for up to seven years.

Seven years? Shoot, you’ll probably be a completely different person by then.

Don’t get discouraged. There are quick ways to start healing your credit. If you make the right moves, you can get your credit score back up around 670what most lenders consider “good.”

Here’s a fast, easy way to see your credit score: Sign up for Credit Sesame, a free service that shows your score and explains it to you.

Now that you know your score, here are four things you should do right away to improve your credit.

How to Fix Credit Fast: Start With These Strategies

1. Use Your Credit Card

Just don’t overuse it, that’s all. Buy something with your credit card every month. Even one or two purchases, like a tank of gas or a gallon of milk or, you know, a bottle of wine. Whatever.

Get a credit card with a signup bonus, cash rewards and no annual fees. Just make sure to pay off your balance every month so you can avoid paying interest. That’s a money drain right there.

This way, you have positive activity on your credit report every month. The credit reporting agencies that calculate your credit score really like that. It’s like petting a cat and making it purr.

2. Don’t Max Out Your Cards

An important part of your credit score is “credit utilization.” That’s a fancy-pants way of saying “how much of your credit you’re actually using.”

Let’s say you have a credit card with a $2,000 limit on it, and you have a balance of $1,000 that you haven’t paid off. You’re using half your credit. Your credit utilization is 50%.

It should really be lower. The lower, the better. This makes more difference than you might think.

3. Dispute Wrong Information

One out of every five credit reports has an error in it, according to a study by the Federal Trade Commission.

So take a look at your credit report, and dispute any incorrect information in it. Don’t worry if you’ve never done this before. It’s really not that hard. If you set aside a little time, you can do this today.

The three major credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion — are each required to give you a free credit report once a year. If you want, you can go to the website Annual Credit Report to get all three at once.

So what are you looking for, here? Well, if you find an “unpaid” credit card that you know you paid, or a bill in collections that you know never existed, you should file a dispute with the appropriate credit bureau.

That can be done online for free. You’ll go to Equifax’s disputes page, or Experian’s, or TransUnion’s.

4. Consolidate Your Debt

To have good credit, it’s important to pay your bills on time. Don’t fall behind.

If you’re drowning in credit card debt and hemorrhaging money on interest payments, consider refinancing your debt with a personal loan.

Once again, it’s easier than you might think. A good place to start is Even Financial, which can help you borrow up to $100,000. Once you type in your info, compares interest rates from several lenders. There’s no charge for this.

Use that loan to pay off your high-interest credit cards. Then you repay the lender a fixed amount every month for a set time period — usually two to four years.

See? Improving your credit doesn’t have to take seven years after all.

Your credit score is a number that ranges between 300 and 850. It’s like a grade that tells lenders how well you manage money and repay debt. Ideally, you want your score to hit at least 670 or so.

Taking steps to improve your credit is worth it. Especially when it comes to major life purchases — houses and cars — the higher your credit score, the better off you’ll be.

Mike Brassfield (mike@thepennyhoarder.com) is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. His credit is OK, but it could be better, frankly.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

This Work-From-Home Job Will Let You Help Others Live the Glamorous Life

If you’re a helpful individual with a love for the finer things in life, this might be the perfect job for you.

Aspire Lifestyles, an international concierge company, is looking to hire 15 virtual lifestyle consultants to fulfill concierge requests for its premium American Express card members.

You’ll help clients live out their best lives and create magical memories by providing luxury concierge services, such as securing fine dining reservations at Parisian restaurants or booking tickets to highly sought-after shows. And you can work from the comfort of your own home!

But if that’s not up your alley, don’t forget to check out our Jobs page on Facebook. We post new opportunities there all the time.

Be a Lifestyle Consultant and Concierge for Aspire Lifestyles

Pay:

$31,000 a year with the ability to earn up to $45,000 annually

Responsibilities include:

  • Delivering luxury concierge services
  • Making tailored recommendations to customers
  • Responding to a high volume of customer requests in a fast-paced virtual environment, which could include phone and web interactions
  • Enhancing the American Express brand in interactions with customers

Applicants for this position must have:

  • A high school diploma or GED
  • At least two years of customer service experience, preferably in a call center environment (experience in the hospitality, travel, entertainment or luxury industries is a plus)
  • Great written and oral communication skills
  • Excellent customer service skills

Benefits include:

  • Opportunity for overtime and performance-based bonuses
  • Medical, dental and vision benefits after 30 days
  • 401 (k) with 3% company match
  • Paid sick, holiday and vacation days
  • A variety of shifts available to work
  • Opportunities to advance to senior-level roles

Apply here for the lifestyle consultant and concierge job with Aspire Lifestyles.

Nicole Dow is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

15 Things That 99% Of Us All Do, But Won’t Admit To

Consider them the original life hacks.

Storing shampoo bottles upside down so you can use every last Herbal Essence drop:

Storing shampoo bottles upside down so you can use every last Herbal Essence drop:

Twitter: @javimezac

And, when you’re getting down to the wire, mixing water with the shampoo to make it last a liiiiiittle longer:

And, when you're getting down to the wire, mixing water with the shampoo to make it last a liiiiiittle longer:

instagram.com

And of course, doing the same thing for dish soap:

And of course, doing the same thing for dish soap:

Twitter: @EricaLauraG

Plus, rolling up your toothpaste tube like this:

Plus, rolling up your toothpaste tube like this:

Twitter: @EuNunez

Via Twitter: @kmng93

And opting out of spending more $$ at the laundromat in favor of nature’s perfectly good dryer:

And opting out of spending more $$ at the laundromat in favor of nature's perfectly good dryer:

Twitter: @julipandiani

Eating your dinner straight out of the pan to cut down on dishwashing:

Eating your dinner straight out of the pan to cut down on dishwashing:

Twitter: @jiisuuus

Filling your wine glass to the brim when you’re by yourself:

Filling your wine glass to the brim when you're by yourself:

Or, even more efficiently, just drinking straight from the bottle.

instagram.com

Trying to class up your snacks like this…

Trying to class up your snacks like this...

Ham and cheese slices never looked so schmancy.

Twitter: @meri_marilu

Forcing yourself to make — and eat — sandwiches made out of the bread butt slices:

Forcing yourself to make — and eat — sandwiches made out of the bread butt slices:

Twitter: @Arantza_Mo

Reading shampoo or cleaning product bottles when you don’t have reading material on hand:

Reading shampoo or cleaning product bottles when you don't have reading material on hand:

Stevecoleimages / Getty Images

Washing clothes in the shower:

Washing clothes in the shower:

twitter.com

Keeping a bag bag:

Keeping a bag bag:

Twitter: @NathyEne13

Giving yourself a quick sniff check when no one’s watching:

Giving yourself a quick sniff check when no one's watching:

*sniffs* Seems fine.

Twitter: @ArletteTroncoso

And, in a pinch, “converting” tube socks into ankle socks because hey, you’re just freakin’ trying your best.

And, in a pinch, "converting" tube socks into ankle socks because hey, you're just freakin' trying your best.

Twitter: @ElpecasGT

This post was translated from Spanish.

15 People Who Accidentally Texted Their Parents Embarrassing, Inappropriate, Or Fucked-Up Photos

I’m cringing on their behalf.

This guy accidentally texted his mom a picture of his girlfriend with ropes attached to the headboard:

This guy accidentally texted his mom a picture of his girlfriend with ropes attached to the headboard:

Twitter: @WhiteKidCanJump

This girl accidentally sent a picture of herself with a bong:

This girl accidentally sent a picture of herself with a bong:

Twitter: @lilsunbabe

Twitter: @STRAYKlDSS

And this girl accidentally sent her mom a pic of her “daddy:

And this girl accidentally sent her mom a pic of her "daddy:

Twitter: @STRAYKlDSS

This guy accidentally sent this ~interesting~ SpongeBob meme to his dad:

This guy accidentally sent this ~interesting~ SpongeBob meme to his dad:

Twitter: @TheGSTL

And this girl accidentally sent her mom a picture of a dick wearing sunglasses:

And this girl accidentally sent her mom a picture of a dick wearing sunglasses:

reddit.com

This girl accidentally texted her dad a picture that called him a “salty bitch”:

This girl accidentally texted her dad a picture that called him a "salty bitch":

Twitter: @sidneyparrishh

This girl texted her dad a nude selfie by accident:

This girl texted her dad a nude selfie by accident:

Twitter: @dearfashionn

This girl’s mom had the best response to her daughter’s wrong text:

This girl's mom had the best response to her daughter's wrong text:

humoar.com

This guy sent this phallic turkey to his dad by accident:

This guy sent this phallic turkey to his dad by accident:

Twitter: @KingDanny34

This girl sent this insane text/picture combo to her dad instead of her sister:

This girl sent this insane text/picture combo to her dad instead of her sister:

Twitter: @marianaaqz

And last but not least, this girl iconically sent her mom pics of her slappin’ the bag by accident:

And last but not least, this girl iconically sent her mom pics of her slappin' the bag by accident:

Twitter: @Doozytoozy

Moral of the story: CHECK WHO THE RECIPIENT IS BEFORE YOU SEND A TEXT.

Moral of the story: CHECK WHO THE RECIPIENT IS BEFORE YOU SEND A TEXT.

VH1

If You Depend on CHIP for Your Children’s Insurance, You Need to Read This

The future of a program designed to help families afford health care for their kids may be in danger.

For the past two decades, the Children’s Health Insurance Program — better known as CHIP —  has been serving families that make too much money to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to cover private health insurance costs.

CHIP has been operating mainly on federal funding, but the program ran out of those funds in September, CNNMoney reported.

The good news? CHIP has bipartisan support, and Congress is working on a reauthorization bill to fund the program for the next five years. According to CNNMoney, the bill has passed in the House, but the Senate hasn’t made much progress on it yet.

The bad news? Congress is unsure how it will fund CHIP going forward, and money needs to be allocated soon to keep the program — which reportedly cost $15.6 billion in fiscal year 2016 — afloat.

Individual states have been using their unspent allotments and grant money to keep CHIP operational, CNNMoney reported, but that Band-aid isn’t going to hold for very long.

CNNMoney reports more than one million children could be left uninsured if the federal government doesn’t step in soon with funding.

Even worse is that there’s not much affected parents can do.

“They can’t really prepare for this,” Genevieve Kenney, co-director of the Health Policy Center at the Urban Institute, told CNNMoney. “There’s not much in their control that can minimize the fallout.”

And even if the federal funding becomes available, this period of uncertainty could have parents questioning the stability of the program.

Laura Guerra-Cardus, deputy director of the Children’s Defense Fund-Texas, told The New York Times the notices states send out about CHIP’s funding dilemma “can really affect the trust” families have in the program.

“So many families still don’t realize this is coming,” she said, “and the few I’ve informed, they go immediately into a state of alarm.”

Nicole Dow is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

What’s An Amazing Reason To Work Out That Has Nothing To Do With Weight Loss?

Like having the strength to complete one pull-up. JUST ONE.

When it comes to fitness, weight loss isn’t everything. Tbh, it’s really just one reason some people might exercise. There are literally tons of other reasons to work out, too.

When it comes to fitness, weight loss isn't everything. Tbh, it's really just one reason some people might exercise. There are literally tons of other reasons to work out, too.

And with the new year quickly approaching, you might be thinking about what your fitness goals are for 2018.

@bea_ker / Via Twitter: @bea_ker

(Not that there's anything wrong with having the goal to change your body, it's just not what we're exploring in this particular post.)

United Artists

Maybe you’ve always wanted to run a marathon, and finally decided that this year is going to be THE YEAR.

Maybe you've always wanted to run a marathon, and finally decided that this year is going to be THE YEAR.

Or maybe it's another kind of event that you've wanted to do, like a mud run or triathlon, and you're getting ready to start training.

United Artists / Via blacknerdproblems.com

Or maybe you’re a traveler who’s tired AF of always struggling to carry your bag upstairs, and you’re not going to take it anymore!

Or maybe you're a traveler who's tired AF of always struggling to carry your bag upstairs, and you're not going to take it anymore!

So you're ready to start lifting weights and building strength.

NBC / Via giphy.com

Perhaps you’re just trying to be more active AND you’ve wanted to ride your bike more. So now you’re going to do both.

Perhaps you're just trying to be more active AND you've wanted to ride your bike more. So now you're going to do both.

It's a win-win. Get it!

NBC / Via makeagif.com

Maybe you want to learn something new, like ballet or pole dancing.

Maybe you want to learn something new, like ballet or pole dancing.

And who knows, you might discover you're really passionate about it.

youtube.com / Via buzzfeed.com

Or maybe your goal is to finally, FINALLY accomplish a single pull-up.

Or maybe your goal is to finally, FINALLY accomplish a single pull-up.

Or perhaps even a set of 10…eventually?

ABC / Via giphy.com

Leave a sentence or two in the box below and feel free to get as detailed as you can. Tell us about what your goal is, why you decided this was going to be the year you got it done, and what you hope to get out of it — along with anything else that you think needs to be said.